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Wanna Hair Grow Faster?, Follow This Tips

Hair Grow FasterDo you dream of having Rapunzel-length locks? If it seems like your hair just isn’t growing as quickly as you’d like, look no further than your hair care routine. And then try these pro-recommended tips to get longer, stronger hair in no time.

1. Get frequent trims — yes, really.

It may seem counterintuitive, but if you want long hair that’s actually healthy, you need to get regular trims. “While haircuts don’t make your hair grow any faster, they get rid of split ends that break your hair,” explains celebrity hairstylist Michael Dueñas. “Eliminating the breakage gives the appearance that your hair is growing faster.” After all, a split end that breaks can lead to your hair losing length — not to mention shine, volume, and smoothness. Not sure how often to trim your hair? We’ve got a guide for that.

 2. Spread the wealth that is your hair’s natural oil.

Going to bed with unbrushed hair may seem tempting when you’re tired, but giving your hair a few quick strokes can be great for its health. “Starting at the scalp, use a boar bristle brush to distribute your scalp’s oils evenly onto your hair so it stays naturally moisturized,” recommends Eva Scrivo Salon senior colorist and hair educator Meri Kate O’Connor. Bonus: This simple step each night helps increase circulation, which helps make your scalp healthier. Which leads us to…

3. Keep your scalp healthy.

Think of your hair like a tree: If the soil and roots aren’t taken care of, the tree can’t grow tall and solid. “Hair growth starts with a healthy scalp,” explains celebrity hairstylist and WEN founder Chaz Dean. “When you cleanse and treat your scalp with healthy ingredients, you product strong, beautiful hair.” If you’re not sure how healthy your hair is, Chaz recommends doing a “root lift test”: At the crown of your head, hold up a section of your hair. Healthy hair should be the same thickness root to end, but if your ends are thinner, it’s time to rethink your haircare regimen.

4. Start from the inside by eating the right foods.

Having long, strong hair doesn’t just depend on which products you put on your hair, it also depends on what you put into your body. “To promote hair growth, you need to ‘feed’ the hair from the inside,” explains Dr. Francesco Fusco, dermatologist and CLEAR Scalp & Hair expert. “Try increasing your protein intake with foods like fish, beans, nuts, and whole gains.” If you’re not a meat-lover, be sure to maintain a diet high in protein — Dr. Fusco warns that women who don’t get enough of it often experience “more shedding.”

5. Stop abusing it with heat styling tools.

The biggest culprit that’s ruining your hair: damage from hot tools. “Stop over-styling your hair,” warns celebrity hairstylist Ken Paves. If you must use heat, Paves recommends decreasing the temperature and always using a heat protectant — otherwise, you risk damaging your locks, leading to breakage and frizz.

6. Skip the daily shampoo.

Good news: Your hair care routine just got a whole lot simpler. By now, you’ve likely heard all the testimonials attributing great hair to going “no ‘poo,” but do you know why it actually helps your hair? “Shampooing your hair two to three times a week is a general rule,” says Paves. “This allows your natural oils to penetrate your hair, allowing it to hydrate and repair itself.” But just be sure not to let too much buildup occur — Dr. Fusco warns that this can lead to a surplus of oil, itching, and dandruff.

7. Add a vitamin to your morning routine.

If your diet isn’t supplying you with enough nutrition, a supplement could make a world of difference. “Look for a multivitamin that’s formulated and labeled ‘For Hair, Skin, and Nails,'” advises Dr. Fusco. “Those contain important vitamins like biotin, vitamin C, and B vitamins that support hair health.” Bonus: You’ll get better skin in the process!

8. Finish your shower with a cool rinse.

A super steamy shower isn’t just bad for your skin — it’s also rough on your hair. “Turn the water temperature down when cleansing,” recommends Paves. “And rinse with cool water to help seal the cuticle and strengthen your hair before styling it.”

9. Stop doing trendy “cleanses.”

Diet companies may try to convince you that a “cleanse” will turn your whole life around, but Dueñas strongly advises against them. “Doing a cleanse is terrible for your hair because you’re depriving your body of nutrients,” he warns. “After doing a cleanse even for a week, you’ll notice slower hair growth and lackluster locks.”

10. Sleep on a silk pillowcase.

Getting better hair in your sleep is possible — all you need is to switch up your pillowcase. “Silk is easier on hair — it helps avoid tangles and breakage,” says Jesleen Ahluwalia, M.D., a physician from Spring Street Dermatology in New York City. The less breakage your hair experiences, the longer your locks will be.

11. Pay attention to how your skin feels after using hair care products.

It’s easy to see shiny locks initiallyand assume a product is working for you, but Dean recommends taking a closer look (and feel). “What the formula is doing to your skin is generally what it’s doing to your hair,” he says. “Does it make your skin f eel dry, stripped, heavy, waxy, sticky, or greasy? Or does it feel soft, hydrated, silky, and supple?” Treat your hair the way you would treat your skin — after all, it’s another part of you! If your hair follicles are clogged and congested, there’s no way it can grow as efficiently.

Great Smokey Eye, Here Its Tips

Smoky EyeThe smoky eye look often sported by stars en route to galas and events is a nighttime favorite for dressing up your eyes. And while all the smudging and blending may not be simple enough to perform blindfolded (not to mention achieving the right wing shape), we sought out a beauty expert to guide us along the path to smoldering, smoky eye perfection.

The biggest smoky eye no-no is staying away from blue hues—which can make you look like you have under-eye circles—says Giorgio Armani makeup artist André Drykin. Instead, go for black, gray, brown or if you want “color,” dark green shadows and liners. Below, he shares five easy steps for recreating a gala-worthy smoky eye on your own :

  1. Apply a cream concealer over your eyelid to create a smooth base for your eyeshadow.
  2. Use a pencil liner to trace your top lashline. Using the same pencil, dot between your lower lashes in a tightline technique and then smudge both lashlines with a cotton swab or brush.
  3. Sweep powder shadow (brown, gray, and dark green work best) over your lid and into your crease, blending the color up and outward, says NYC makeup artist Morgen Schick DeMann.
  4. Dust a lighter, neutral eyeshadow (such as ivory) over just your browbone. Or, to prevent color from fading and give your lids a more shimmery finish, pat a cream shadow over the concealer on your lid first, wait five minutes, then top with a matching powder shadow.
  5. Finish with two coats of black mascara.

Try These Healthy Skin Tips

Healthy SkinDon’t have time for intensive skin care? You can still pamper yourself by acing the basics. Good skin care and healthy lifestyle choices can help delay the natural aging process and prevent various skin problems. Get started with these five no-nonsense tips.

 1. Protect yourself from the sun

One of the most important ways to take care of your skin is to protect it from the sun. A lifetime of sun exposure can cause wrinkles, age spots and other skin problems — as well as increase the risk of skin cancer.

For the most complete sun protection:

  • Use sunscreen. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply sunscreen generously, and reapply every two hours — or more often if you’re swimming or perspiring.
  • Seek shade. Avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest.
  • Wear protective clothing. Cover your skin with tightly woven long-sleeved shirts, long pants and wide-brimmed hats. Also consider laundry additives, which give clothing an additional layer of ultraviolet protection for a certain number of washings, or special sun-protective clothing — which is specifically designed to block ultraviolet rays.

2. Don’t smoke

 Smoking makes your skin look older and contributes to wrinkles. Smoking narrows the tiny blood vessels in the outermost layers of skin, which decreases blood flow. This depletes the skin of oxygen and nutrients that are important to skin health.

Smoking also damages collagen and elastin — the fibers that give your skin strength and elasticity. In addition, the repetitive facial expressions you make when smoking — such as pursing your lips when inhaling and squinting your eyes to keep out smoke — can contribute to wrinkles.

If you smoke, the best way to protect your skin is to quit. Ask your doctor for tips or treatments to help you stop smoking.

3. Treat your skin gently

Daily cleansing and shaving can take a toll on your skin. To keep it gentle:

  • Limit bath time. Hot water and long showers or baths remove oils from your skin. Limit your bath or shower time, and use warm — rather than hot — water.
  • Avoid strong soaps. Strong soaps and detergents can strip oil from your skin. Instead, choose mild cleansers.
  • Shave carefully. To protect and lubricate your skin, apply shaving cream, lotion or gel before shaving. For the closest shave, use a clean, sharp razor. Shave in the direction the hair grows, not against it.
  • Pat dry. After washing or bathing, gently pat or blot your skin dry with a towel so that some moisture remains on your skin.
  • Moisturize dry skin. If your skin is dry, use a moisturizer that fits your skin type. For daily use, consider a moisturizer that contains SPF.
 4. Eat a healthy diet

A healthy diet can help you look and feel your best. Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins. The association between diet and acne isn’t clear — but some research suggests that a diet rich in vitamin C and low in unhealthy fats and processed or refined carbohydrates might promote younger looking skin.

 5. Manage stress

Uncontrolled stress can make your skin more sensitive and trigger acne breakouts and other skin problems. To encourage healthy skin — and a healthy state of mind — take steps to manage your stress. Set reasonable limits, scale back your to-do list and make time to do the things you enjoy. The results might be more dramatic than you expect.

Acne Scars Tips

It may seem that acne scars are inevitable; however, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of seeing scars when the acne clears.

Dermatologists recommend the following:

Treat the acne

The fewer breakouts you have, the less likely you are to develop acne scars.

Treating acne is especially important to prevent scarring, if you have any of the following:

  • Severe (painful cysts and nodules) acne: This type of acne is more likely to leave a scar as it clears.
  • Acne that began at a young age: People who develop acne in their preteens often develop severe acne within few years. Dermatologists recommend that a preteen who has acne receive a dermatologic exam. Treating the acne before it becomes severe has benefits, including less risk of developing acne scars.
  • Blood relatives who have acne scars: The tendency to develop acne scars often runs in the family.
  • No results with acne treatments that you can buy without a prescription: A dermatologist can help you find effective treatment for your acne.

When acne clears, continue treatment

To keep your skin blemish free, dermatologists recommend continuing acne treatment. Most people can taper their treatment so that they use 1 product a few times per week.

A dermatologist can tell you when you can stop treating your skin.

Avoid picking, squeezing, and popping

Picking, popping, and squeezing can turn a minor breakout into a major problem — a permanent acne scar.

Practice gentle skin care

When acne flares, many people scrub their skin clean. Scrubbing your skin tends to worsen acne. The worse acne gets, the greater your chance of seeing permanent scars when the acne clears.

References:

Lee DH et al. “Comparison of a 585-nm pulsed dye laser and a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser for the treatment of acne scars: A randomized split-face clinical study.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2009; 60:801-7.
Thiboutot, D et al. “New insights into the management of acne: An update from the Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne Group.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2009;60:5(sup. 1) S1-S50.

How to Treat Hair Dandruff

Dandruff is a common scalp condition in which small pieces of dry skin flake off of the scalp. If you have dark hair or you’re wearing dark colors, you may notice the flakes in your hair or on your shoulders. Dandruff may also make your scalp itch.

Many people believe that dandruff is caused by poor hygiene, but this is not true. Although infrequent shampooing can make dandruff more obvious, researchers are still studying the causes, which appear to be complex.

The most effective way to treat and control dandruff is to use dandruff shampoo and scalp treatments. Follow these tips from dermatologists to get the best results:

  1. Follow the instructions on the dandruff shampoo bottle: There are many different dandruff shampoos, and each contains different active ingredients for controlling symptoms. To get the best results, always follow the instructions on the bottle. For example, some dandruff shampoos require that you lather the shampoo into the hair and scalp and leave the shampoo in for about five minutes before rinsing. Others should not be left on the scalp.
  2. If you are Caucasian or Asian, shampoo daily and use dandruff shampoo twice a week: If using one dandruff shampoo does not bring relief, try alternating between dandruff shampoos with different active ingredients.
  3. If you are African-American, only shampoo once a week using a dandruff shampoo: See a board-certified dermatologist for the best product recommendation for your hair type.
  4. Be careful when using a dandruff shampoo that contains coal tar: Tar shampoo can discolor blonde, grey or white hair, so if you have light-colored hair, you may want to choose a different dandruff shampoo. Tar shampoo also has the potential to make your scalp more sensitive to sunlight. If you use this type of dandruff shampoo, it’s important to protect your scalp from the sun by wearing a hat when outdoors and seeking shade whenever possible.

For most people, dandruff does not require medical attention. However, sometimes the flaking and itching that appears like dandruff is actually a medical condition, such as seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infections of the scalp, or eczema.

If you continue to have symptoms after using a dandruff shampoo, consult a board-certified dermatologist. A dermatologist can properly diagnose your condition and recommend a treatment plan that best meets your needs.

Steps to Apply self tanner

These basic tips will help you apply a self-tanner so you get even coverage and longer-lasting results.

Follow these steps :

    1. Exfoliate. Use a washcloth to exfoliate the skin prior to applying a self-tanner. Using an exfoliating product also will help remove dead skin cells. Spend a little more time exfoliating where your skin is thickest — elbows, knees and ankles.
    2. Dry your skin. Drying your skin before you apply a self-tanner helps it go on evenly.
    3. Apply in sections. Apply the self-tanner in sections (such as the arms, then legs, followed by the torso). Massage the self-tanner into your skin in a circular motion.
    4. Wash your hands after each section. You will avoid orange-colored palms by washing your hands with soap and water after you finish applying the self-tanner to each section of your body.
    5. Blend at your wrists and ankles. For a natural look, you need to lightly extend the tanner from your wrists to your hands and from your ankles to your feet.
    6. Dilute over your joints. Dilute the self-tanner on the knees, ankles and elbows, because these areas tend to absorb more self-tanner than the rest of the skin. To dilute, lightly rub with a damp towel or apply a thin layer of lotion on top of the self-tanner.
    7. Give your skin time to dry. Wait at least 10 minutes before getting dressed. For the next three hours, it is best to wear loose clothing and try to avoid sweating.
    8. Apply sunscreen every day. You still need to protect your skin with sunscreen. Be sure that your sunscreen offers all of the following:
  • SPF 30 or higher.
  • Broad-spectrum protection (UVA/UVB protection).
  • Water resistance.

Steps to Shave

Shaving can be a challenge for both men and women. Here are dermatologists’ tips to help you get a clean shave :

    1. Before you shave, wet your skin and hair to soften it. Taking a shower or bath is a great way to soften your hair.
    2. Next, apply a shaving cream or gel.
    3. Be sure to shave in the direction that the hair grows.
    4. Change blades or throw away disposable razors after 5 to 7 shaves to help minimize irritation.
    5. Men who have acne should take special care while shaving. Shaving can irritate your skin, making acne worse.
  • If you have acne on your face, try experimenting with electric or disposable blade razors to see which work best for you.
  • Use a razor with a sharp blade.
  • Shave lightly to prevent nicks and never try to shave off the acne as both can make acne worse.

Keep Your Nail Healthy with This Helpful Tips

Nails reflect our overall health, which is why proper nail care is so important. Here are dermatologists’ tips for keeping your nails healthy:

  • Keep nails clean and dry.
  • Cut nails straight across. Use sharp nail scissors or clippers. Round the nails slightly at the tips for maximum strength.
  • Keep nails shaped and free of snags by filing with an emery board.
  • Do not bite fingernails or remove the cuticle. Doing so can damage the nail.
  • Do not use your nails as a tool, such as opening pop cans.
  • Trim toenails regularly. Keeping them short will minimize the risk of trauma and injury.
  • When toenails are thick and difficult to cut, soak your feet in warm salt water. Mix one teaspoon of salt per pint of water and soak for 5 to 10 minutes.
  • Avoid “digging out” ingrown toenails, especially if they are infected and sore. If you are suffering from an ingrown toenail, see a dermatologist for treatment.
  • Wear shoes that fit properly. Also alternate which pair of shoes you wear each day.
  • Wear flip flops at the pool and in public showers. This reduces the risk of infections caused by a fungus that can get in your toenails.

If your nails change, swell, or cause pain, see your dermatologist because these can be signs of serious nail problems. If you have diabetes or poor circulation, it’s especially important to seek treatment for any nail problems. If you have questions or concerns about caring for your nails, see a dermatologist.

Know more about Vitamins for Your Skin

Nourish your skin

You’re diligent about fruits, veggies, and multis, but your skin care routine is still missing vitamins.

Research shows that certain nutrients are essential for preventing and reversing many signs of skin aging. A well-balanced diet is important, of course—eating a variety of healthy foods helps keep skin supple and glowing. But the fact is, “the body delivers only a certain percentage of vitamins to your skin, no matter how much you ingest,” says Mary Lupo, MD, clinical professor of dermatology at Tulane University School of Medicine. Plus, there’s no way to send them straight to your crow’s feet or brown spots.

The solution: Applying vitamins topically to deliver maximum anti-aging benefits—everything from improving texture and tone to fading under-eye circles. Follow this user’s guide to the letter, and soon your skin will look better than ever.

1. Vitamin A for wrinkles

Best overall age-fighter

Find it in: OTC lotions, night creams (vitamin A derivatives are known as retinoids), and prescription products

Proven to: Reduce wrinkles, fade brown spots, and smooth roughness. “There are more than 700 published studies on retinoids—they’re tried-and-true ingredients. Anyone who wants younger-looking skin should use one,” says Doris Day, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at New York University Langone Medical Center.

How to use: Apply your retinoid at night—sunlight inactivates most forms of vitamin A. Prescription retinoids work fastest, within four to eight weeks. The downside: They’re irritating, causing redness, scaling, and flaking that can last for weeks or longer. OTC products are best for beginners; you’ll experience fewer skin care side effects because the retinol they contain is slowly converted to retinoic acid, the active ingredient in prescription creams. To avoid irritation, apply an OTC or prescription retinoid every second or third night, at least for the first two weeks, and build up to nightly use. Apply sparingly; a pea-size amount is enough to cover your entire face.

2. Vitamin B3 for redness

Boosts hydration to reduce redness

Find it in: Lotions, creams, and serums. It’s often called niacinamide on the label.

Proven to: Increase production of ceramides and fatty acids, two key components of your skin’s outer protective barrier. “As that barrier is strengthened, skin is better able to keep moisture in and irritants out—making B3 a great ingredient if your complexion is dry or sensitive,” says Leslie S. Baumann, MD, director of the University of Miami Cosmetic Medicine and Research Institute. In one study, a moisturizer with niacinamide improved the flushing and blushing of rosacea, a common condition that can worsen with age. Another B3 skin care benefit: It inhibits the transfer of pigment to skin cells, minimizing dark spots.

How to use: For maximum results, apply B3 vitamins in the morning and evening. To reduce irritation from your retinoid, use it in conjunction with niacinamide. “Mix them together in the palm of your hand before applying—they won’t inactivate each other,” says Baumann. Besides decreasing side effects, the combo produces superior anti-aging benefits.

3. Vitamin C for spots

All-around anti-ager

Find it in: Moisturizers formulated to keep vitamin C stable (opaque, airtight containers are ideal). Look for C near the middle of the ingredients panel to help ensure the 5% or higher concentration needed to see skin care benefits, advises Hema Sundaram, MD, a dermatologist in the Washington, DC, area.

Proven to: Mop up the free radicals that trigger wrinkling, sagging, and other aging changes. Vitamin C also helps smooth and firm skin and fade brown spots. In one study, women who treated sun-damaged skin with a C cream for six months saw significant improvement in fine lines and discoloration. Though the benefits of retinoids (see vitamin A) and vitamin C sound similar, using both delivers more complexion perfection. “Skin aging occurs in various ways, so you need multiple forms of defense and repair,” says Dr. Lupo.

How to use: Apply vitamin C in the morning before sunscreen to shield your skin from any UV-generated free radicals that get by your sunblock.

4. Vitamin E for moisture

Eases dryness and bolsters skin’s UV defense

Find it in: Sunscreens and after-sun products. The best anti-aging products contain at least 1% vitamin E, so it will be listed near the middle of the ingredients panel.

Proven to: Quell dryness by helping skin retain its natural moisturizers. Also, vitamin E’s potent ability to neutralize damaging free radicals has earned it the moniker “the protector.” A slew of skin care studies document its superstar status. In one, E significantly reduced the number of these unstable molecules created after exposure to cigarette smoke. Others show that when it’s used before UV exposure, skin is less red, swollen, and dry.

How to use: Apply before and after serious sun exposure. A single strong blast of UV light can destroy half the skin’s natural supply of E, so shore up defenses by slathering on a sunscreen supplemented with E and C before going into the sun—the C helps ensure effectiveness. An after-sun salve with E helps, too, says Oceanside, CA, dermatologist Jens Thiele, MD, PhD, a vitamin E expert. Some studies show that the anti-inflammatory action kicks in to reduce damage even after you’ve been in the sun.

5. Vitamin K for dark circles

For younger, brighter eyes

Find it in: Eye creams that also contain retinol.

Proven to: Possibly help lighten under-eye circles. Fragile capillaries that allow blood to leak into skin are considered one cause of under-eye circles, and vitamin K (aka phytonadione) may put the skids on this seepage by controlling blood clotting. Daily use of a K cream significantly lightened circles after 4 months in one study, but because the cream also contained retinol, researchers aren’t sure which ingredient deserves credit for the improvement—retinol alone thickens the translucent under-eye skin (making it harder to see the dark blood vessels below) and lightens melanin that makes circles more prominent. Still, it can’t hurt to try a cream that contains vitamin K and retinol; according to Dr. Baumann, the retinol may enhance K’s ability to penetrate skin and knock out darkness.

How to use: Apply nightly. First allow skin to become acclimated to the retinol—use once or twice the first week, and add a night every week after.

About Vitamin E

Vitamin E, you can slather it on your skin or swallow it in a capsule. Praised as an antioxidant, vitamin E also helps your body in a number of other ways, such as helping your immune system and helping keep vessels healthy.

There are claims that vitamin E, as an antioxidant, fights a host of conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, age-related vision loss, wrinkles, and even certain cancers. And cosmetic shelves are loaded with goods that contain vitamin E that claim to reverse age-related skin damage. The real benefits behind vitamin E are found in the seesaw balance of free radicals and antioxidants.

Free Radicals and Antioxidants

Free radicals in the body are oxygen molecules that lose an electron, which makes them unstable. These unstable molecules interact with cells in the body in a way that can cause damage. As the process snowballs, cells can be damaged and you are made vulnerable to disease.

Free radicals can be created by our bodies as we age, or by everyday factors like digestion or exercise. They’re also caused by exposure to external things like:

  • tobacco smoke
  • ozone
  • environmental pollutants
  • radiation

Antioxidants neutralize free radicals by donating the missing electrons that destabilize them. Antioxidants are found in many foods and are also made in our bodies using the vitamins and minerals found in foods.

How Much Vitamin E Do You Need?

 Vitamin E can increase your risk of bleeding. You should avoid taking excessive amounts of the vitamin if you have a bleeding disorder or take blood thinners. Vitamin E is also associated with a greater risk of stroke.

Unless your diet is very low in fat, it’s likely that you’re getting enough vitamin E. But smoking, air pollution, and even exposure to harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun can deplete your body’s stores of the vitamin.

According to the National Institutes of Health, teenagers and adults should get about 15 mg of vitamin E a day. Pregnant women should get the same, and breastfeeding women should up that to 19 mg.

For children, they recommend 4-5 mg for infants, 6 mg for children between 1-3 years old, 7 mg for those between ages 4-8, and 11 mg from ages 9-13 years.

You don’t need capsules and oil to get vitamin E. Many processed foods, especially cereals and juices, are fortified with vitamin E. It’s also found naturally in many foods, including:

  • vegetable oils, especially wheat germ, sunflower, and safflower oils
  • nuts and seeds
  • avocados and other fats

Exposing the Myths

Since their identification, free radicals, vitamin E, and other antioxidants have been subject to research for their ability to prevent a number of diseases.

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is the primary cause of blindness in people age 55 and older. A study conducted by the National Eye Institute found that taking high levels of antioxidants and zinc can decrease your risk of getting advanced macular degeneration by as much as 25 percent.

1. Heart Protection

It’s believed that people with higher levels of vitamin E are at reduced risk of heart disease. But one study that followed over 14,000 U.S. males for eight years found no cardiovascular benefit from taking vitamin E supplements. In fact, the study determined that vitamin E was associated with a higher risk of stroke.

2. Cancer

Another study that followed 35,000 men for five years found that taking vitamin E supplements had no effect when it came to lowering any type of cancer risk. A 2011 follow-up found that study participants who had taken vitamin E actually had a 17 percent higher risk of developing prostate cancer.

3. Skin Healing

Vitamin E is widely touted as a salve that helps speed healing and reduce scarring. While there have been a few studies that support this, the greatest body of research indicates that vitamin E does not help skin wounds heal faster.

One study found that slathering vitamin E oil can actually worsen the appearance of scars, or simply have no effect at all. About a third of participants developed contact dermatitis, which is a type of skin rash.

The Vitamin E Paradox

The rush to supplement our diets with antioxidants, including vitamin E, may not be the best course of action. Some experts argue that taking large doses of any antioxidant has no real preventative or therapeutic value unless deficiency is your problem.

In March 2005, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions published an article in the Annals of Internal Medicine, which claimed high doses of vitamin E may significantly increase mortality by all causes. Their findings, based on a review of 19 clinical trials, unleashed a firestorm of rebuttals, but little in the way of scientific proof.

So, should you use vitamin E oil? It’s not likely it will have positive effects on your skin, and carries a high risk of skin rash. As for taking vitamin E internally, if you take the recommended dose, it’s considered relatively safe. Excessively high doses of vitamin E are not recommended.

Healthy Hair Tips

A woman’s hair is her crown, and it’s no secret that if you love how your hair looks, you’ll feel like you can take on the world. Though it’s virtually impossible to never have a bad hair day again, there are some quick, every day tips that will help to keep your hair looking good the majority of the time. Whether you’re trying to get your hair healthier, wondering about whether or not to color or you’re simply searching for ways to make styling your hair easier, below are 20 of the best hair tips you’ll ever read.

1. To keep fly away at bay, spray hairspray onto a clean toothbrush and brush back any rogue hairs.

2. If you have a hair color appointment, use a deep conditioning mask about three days beforehand so that the color can really be absorbed into your strands.

3. Growing out your hair? There are certain foods that will help your hair grow faster, like salmon, yellow peppers, eggs and more.

4. For static-y hair, run a dryer sheet over your head to prevent your hair from getting clingy.

5. Thinking of a major hair makeover? Try on the new hairstyle you want in our Virtual Makeover salon before making a big commitment you may regret.

6. Never use a brush on wet hair. Stick to a wide toothed comb to avoid breakage when your hair is wet.

7. Instead of drying your hair with a towel, use a t-shirt. Rubbing hair with a terry cloth towel can cause friction, leading to frizz and breakage, but with a cotton t-shirt, excess water is absorbed without any friction.

8. The textured side of the bobby pin is actually the side that should rest against your head for optimal hold.

9. To make your blowout last longer, hit your hair with your blow dryer on the cool setting once you’re done styling. Heat styles hair, but cool air sets it.

10. Dry shampoo not only absorbs excess oil in your hair, it also gives it volume. Even if your hair is squeaky clean, apply dry shampoo at the root to give it an extra lift.

11. Help protect your hair color and make it last longer, by using a UV-protection hairspray and use it before heading outside year-round, not just in the summer.

12. To get your bobby pins to really stay in place, spray them with hairspray before putting them in your hair.

13. When applying hair serum, stick to the ends of your hair, not the roots. By applying at your ends, you’ll help smooth out any dry, split ends.

14. If you’re going to color your hair at home, only move two shades away from your current color, whether it be lighter or darker.

15. Sleeping on a silk pillowcase can help to decrease the amount of breakage happening to your hair when you toss and turn throughout the night.

16. To keep blonde hair color pure, use silver shampoo.

17. While you’re at the gym, use three stacked hair elastics for your ponytail instead of one, which will help keep the lengths of your hair off of your neck.

18. When styling your hair, keep in mind that dirty hair holds style better. If your hair is clean, use products like texturizing spray and root powder to give it better hold.

19. Know what your hair type is, and style accordingly. Many women believe they have thick hair when it’s actually fine hair and vice versa, but once you diagnose which hair type you have, you can take care of it properly.

20. A low heat setting on a hot styling tool can be just as dangerous as a high heat setting, because on a lower heat you’ll be passing over your hair more frequently. Set your tools on a medium temperature to keep things in moderation.